We who preach the gospel must not think of ourselves as public relations agents sent to establish good will between Christ and the world. We must not imagine ourselves commissioned to make Christ acceptable to big business, the press, the world of sports or modern education. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum. A.W. Tozer
Therefore let God-inspired Scripture decide between us; and on whichever side be found doctrines in harmony with the word of God, in favor of that side will be cast the vote of truth. --Basil of Caesarea
Once you learn to discern, there's no going back. You will begin to spot the lie everywhere it appears.

I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, because He considered me faithful, putting me into service. 1 Timothy 1:12

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Random Good Articles

The articles linked to below are good for educating yourself on the various issues so as to be able to intelligently discuss them with others. You’ll notice the majority have to do with the Roman Catholic faith, demonstrating the unbiblical nature of some of their doctrines.



10 signs of a cultic church. I may have posted this last year, but there’s no reason why the warning can’t be repeated!


Scripture is to be believed over tradition and church councils.




Give up Lent for Lent.  Quit doing Romanist works.

An excellent collection of citations from early Church “Fathers” which demonstrates that the Papist dogma of transubstantiation was never even thought of until a corrupt human organization invented it.  Then there is this follow-up article.


Examining the Roman Catholic Priesthood. It really is no more biblical than the Mormon priesthood.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Disappearing Mushrooms vs Longstanding Oaks


Historians say that the sacred music of the Christian church, such as that of Palestrina, Allegri and Tallis, is one of the greatest gifts of the gospel to Western civilization and on a par with the splendor of the magnificent European cathedrals, such as Chartres and Lincoln. Yet this rich treasury is an unknown world to many Evangelicals, whose worship music often draws only from songs written after 2000 and does not even include the rich heritage of Celtic Ireland, St. Francis of Assisi, Isaac Watts, Charles Wesley, and Fanny Crosby. Thank God for magnificent exceptions, such as the rich, deep hymns of Keith Getty and Stuart Townend, which will join the music of the ages. But much of the run-of-the-mill renewal songs, which are repeated endlessly and constructed more on rhythm than melody, confine Evangelicals within as shallow theology, threadbare worship, fleeting relevance, and historical amnesia.  Along with soft preaching and a general rage for innovation, such music is another reason why many Evangelical churches resemble a field of quick-growing, quick-disappearing mushrooms rather than a longstanding forest of oaks. Again and again I have been regaled with the church growth maxim, “You have to sacrifice one generation to reach the next.” But this turns on a false assumption, and it leads to the telling fact that the fatal weakness of Evangelical church growth is succession.  Church growth “success” without succession will always prove a failure in the end.

Os Guinness, Impossible People, pg.175-176

Saturday, February 17, 2018

Are You a “Whatever” Person?


Yet most probably the greatest danger in the coming generations will not be in the extremes but in the soft center of almost-anything-goes, amiable accommodationism of current Evangelicalism. As in the time of the prophet Elijah, the postmodern church has become a breeding ground for the undecided, for fence sitters, for people who want to have their cake and eat it too, and so for syncretists who have forgotten the meaning of the word. There are too many Christians weary of taking a stand because they are so wary of repeating the mistakes of the past.  They have become “whatever” people, those who hedge their bets and watch from the sidelines to see who will win the contest on the Mount Carmels of our day.

Os Guinness, Impossible People, pg.111

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Watch Out for “Brave New Christians”


The greatest scholars of our age, liberal and not only conservative, along with the united voices of the greatest scholars of all the ages, have shown beyond all reasonable doubt that the Bible is plainly opposed to homosexual behavior, just as it is to all heterosexual sexual behavior outside of marriage—and they are confirmed in their conclusion by the majority of homosexual scholars themselves.  Yet our brave new Christians trust in their own brilliant reinterpretations and serve their own interests without a qualm.  Thomas Jefferson trembled when he pondered on slavery and remembered that God was just. It is surely time for some Christians to tremble when we read and hear the casual twisting and discarding of Scripture by those who still claim to be faithful. There is a rottenness in the church that must be addressed. Christians too need to return and stand humbly and obediently with all their fellow believers before the lordship and authority of Jesus Pantocrator, ruler, sustainer and judge of all the world.

Os Guinness, Impossible People, pg.110

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Three Questions to Always Ask


There are always essential questions too ask of anyone we hear or anything we read. What is being said? Is it true? And what of it? All three questions are discounted in our modern age of information, but as Christians we must never allow the truth question to be removed from its central place. To be sure, faithfulness is costly in the short term. It is upstream and against the flow, and the flow that was once politically correct can suddenly become a raging and life-threatening intolerance. But costly though that stand may be, it is never as costly as the long-term price of rejecting the authority of Jesus and abandoning the way of life in the gospel. Our Lord warned of that very danger: “Do not fear those who kill the body but are unable to kill the soul; but rather fear Him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell” (Mt10:28). 

Os Guinness, Impossible People, pg.73-74

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Good, Bad, and Ugly

The Good:

Excellent article about the Roman Catholic Eucharist.  If you haven’t read my article on this topic, you might also find it to be of value.


The Bad:
The Gospel Coalition often surprises me with apostate ideas. Now they think church should be a “safe space” for homosexuals.

The Roman Catholic propaganda movie, The Passion of the Christ, is having a sequel made.  I’m sure it won’t be any more of a solid biblical presentation than the original.  I think I’ll save my money and read the book. For another review of “The Passion…”, this one is much more thorough mine.

Uh boy, the nonsensical Enneagram is coming back in style.

Jen Hatmaker and “de-conversion” stories.

A church of the apostate ELCA denomination is assisting an Islamic terrorist organization!! 

The Ugly:
A good history of the Roman Catholic doctrine of indulgences.  It’s a long read, but very informative.


The Episcopal Church continues to demonstrate its totally apostate condition.

At the source of the New Apostolic Reformation is the late Bob Jones — and this short video shows what a false teacher/prophet he was.

Paula White — this woman is spiritually dangerous!!!  And this is who supposedly led President Trump to Christ.  I really doubt that Trump has a true understanding of the Gospel.

This is beyond words — only shock and amazement at such stupidity.  I guess when you have an agenda, anything goes.

Finally, more proof that not only is Perry Noble not qualified to be a pastor, but it’s extremely doubtful that he is even a Christian.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

SIGH!


Why is it that the bands (whether small or large) which perform during the gathering of the saints in the assembly on Sundays (or any day) are called “worship bands,” or “praise bands” (or instead of “bands” they are called “teams,” but with the same prefix)?  They aren’t any of those prefixes —they are just bands or music teams.  “Worship” and “praise” covers more (and should cover all) of the activities in “church.”

Well, that’s just an aside.  This post is about more pap being sung in the assembly.  Here are two we used this week (at least we also sang two old hymns!).

Our God Saves
By Brenton Brown and Paul Baloche.

In the name of the Father, in the name of the Son
In the name of the Spirit, Lord, we come
We're gathered together to lift up Your Name
To call on our Savior to fall on Your grace

In the name of the Father, in the name of the Son
In the name of the Spirit, Lord, we come
We're gathered together to lift up Your Name
To call on our Savior to fall on Your grace
To call on our Savior, to fall on Your grace

Hear the joyful sound of our offering
As Your saints bow down, as Your people sing
We will rise with You, lifted on Your wings
And the world will see that

Our God saves, our God saves
There is hope in Your name
Our God saves, our God saves
There is hope in Your name

[repeat all the above after the obligatory bridge for the band performance]

Mourning turns to songs of praise
Our God saves, our God saves
Our God saves, our God saves.

Why must we always go around and around repeating the text of the lyrics?  I realize the artists singing these songs on their CDs are doing this, but that doesn’t mean the congregation should be performing these songs as if we are on stage!

Think about this part of the song;
Hear the joyful sound of our offering
As Your saints bow down, as Your people sing
We will rise with You, lifted on Your wings

So our offering gives a joyful sound as we bow down and sing, and this makes us rise with God?!?  Really. And “lifted” on His “wings”?!?  What is this supposed to mean? I wonder about these song writer—do they think about what they are writing or are they just trying some way of making rhymes? Or to make the emotions get all sappy?

Let’s look at the next one:

Give Us Clean Hands
By Charlie Hall

We bow our Hearts
We bend our knees
Oh Spirit come make us humble
We turn our eyes from evil things
Oh Lord we cast down our idols

So give us clean hands
Give us pure hearts
Let us not lift our souls to another
Give us clean hands
Give us pure hearts
Let us not lift our souls to another
And God let us be
A generation that seeks
That seeks your face
Oh God of Jacob
And God let us be
A generation that seeks
That seeks your face
Oh God of Jacob

We bow our Hearts
We bend our knees
Oh Spirit come make us humble
We turn our eyes from evil things
Oh Lord we cast out our idols

So give us clean hands
Give us pure hearts
Let us not lift our souls to another
Give us clean hands
Give us pure hearts
Let us not lift our souls to another
And God let us be
A generation that seeks
That seeks your face
Oh God of Jacob
And God let us be
A generation that seeks
That seeks your face
Oh God of Jacob

So give us clean hands
Give us pure hearts
Let us not lift our souls to another
Give us clean hands
Give us pure hearts
Let us not lift our souls to another
And God let us be
A generation that seeks
That seeks your face
Oh God of Jacob
And God let us be
A generation that seeks
That seeks your face
Oh God of Jacob
Oh God of Jacob

We bow our hearts to you

And we had a wee bit more repetition than shown here! Does it make the song better to have so much repetition?  Does it make a stronger point of what is asked of God?  Or does this sort of fit into “vain repetition” in our prayer?  I think it does!

Again, this is nothing better than pap.  Why can’t the song leaders quit trying to be like every seeker-sensitive/market-driven assembly and give their congregations meat!! Please, you men who are in church leadership and you who lead the music, don’t treat your congregations like spiritual babies!

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Another Hillsong Pap Song


This song was used in our assembly a couple weeks ago, and I finally got a chance to examine the lyrics. The author of the lyrics has enough problems as it is, being very ecumenical in her ideology and singing for the Pope.

So let’s dissect this song a wee bit:

Worthy Is The Lamb (Thank You for the Cross)
Hillsong Worship, Songwriter: Darlene Joyce Zschech

Thank you for the cross, Lord
Thank you for the price You paid
Bearing all my sin and shame
In love You came
And gave amazing grace

I’m always amazed at how much Christians virtually worship the cross on which Jesus was crucified.  It wasn’t the cross which brought our salvation!  God could have used any other method of execution, because Jesus didn’t really pay for our sin by the punishment of the cross, but rather the punishment of God and by dying to pay for our sins. 

Thank you for this love, Lord
Thank you for the nail pierced hands
Washed me in Your cleansing flow
Now all I know
Your forgiveness and embrace

Worthy is the Lamb
Seated on the throne
Crown You now with many crowns
You reign victorious

High and lifted up
Jesus Son of God
The Darling of Heaven crucified
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

Here we use the KJV “darling,” a word which has a whole different connotation nowadays, as in a word you call your sweetheart! In KJV it means “only one.”  When “darling” is used in a modern song like this, it really slants to the “Jesus is my boyfriend” genre. 

Thank you for the cross, Lord (thank you)
Thank you for the price You paid
Bearing all my sin and shame
In love You came
And gave amazing grace

Thank you for this love, Lord
Thank you for the nail pierced hands
Washed me in Your cleansing flow
Now all I know
Your forgiveness and embrace

Worthy is the Lamb
Seated on the throne
Crown You now with many crowns
You reign victorious

High and lifted up
Jesus Son of God
The Darling of Heaven crucified
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

Worthy is the Lamb
Seated on the throne
Crown You now with many crowns
You reign victorious

High and lifted up
Jesus Son of God
The Darling of Heaven crucified
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb
Worthy is the Lamb

Notice the inane repetition!  This may be a fine song for personal listening, but it is NOT for congregational singing!  The intent of the last half of this song is obviously to manufacture emotions.  

This pap does NOT belong in the assembly for worship—NOTHING associated with Hillsong should ever be used in the assembly.